Wednesday, July 21, 2010

The Veranda @ Carcosa Sri Negara


KL has several worthwhile choices for Malay fine-dining, but this outlet at Carcosa Seri Negara is the one that seems most steeped in history.


Ikan Tuna Labu Kecil Kepal Kerdil Pais Kelapa Kering. A long name for what was essentially pan-fried tuna with local spices, served with pumpkin curry sauce & spicy pomegranate. The fish tasted fresh and succulent enough to recommend.


Otak-otak Berkirai (baked mackerel fish cake with crispy prawn & honey seafood black sauce). A fine mix of tastes of textures _ blending traditional and modern sensibilities _ made the otak-otak more memorable than the average stall offering.


Consomme of spring chicken confit ravioli. A subtly tasty, well-executed Italian twist to the beloved Asian chicken soup, though carnivores who prefer large chunks of meat in their broth might be disappointed.


Ikan "Tun" Khazanah Laut (salmon marinated with turmeric, grilled with salt & local herbs, then served with seafood sauce). Not quite as satisfying as The Veranda's Western preparation for salmon, especially since the sauce was overwhelmingly salty.


Lamb Rogan Josh (lamb rack braised with Indian herbs, onions & cinnamon). Probably the spiciest item on the menu, but it tasted a bit more Malay than Indian.


Raspberry & chocolate souffle with rose water milkshake. Something different from the usual desserts, but rose water and choc aren't exactly a match made in heaven.


Sarawak pineapple tart with green tea ice cream & caramel sauce. Nicely done.


Click here for earlier entry on The Veranda (April 26).


The Veranda,
Carcosa Seri Negara.
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13 comments:

  1. doesn't look like malay cuisine as well. heard disappointing remarks from my friends about this place and I'm sure it's going to burn a hole in the pocket dining here. I rather go to the mamak. heheh

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  2. I've never been to any malay fine dining eateries before. Maybe I should give it a shot some day.

    Anyway, have you tried ibunda before?

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  3. wow, who would have thought, malay fine cuisine! but i think there isnt much of similar establishment because there's so many nice malay food around at a much much lower price! :D im happy with my mamak too!

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  4. the malay food looks like the kind you find at Bunga Emas, no? i'd love to try the food here someday. that ikan tuna labu etc etc is quite a mouthful, and it looks like my primary and secondary education in bahasa malaysia never prepared me for all those big words. bah, another fault of our education system! (also, a page out of our leadership...blame everyone but yourself.)

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  5. Oh so they change the name from Gulai House? Errrm so pomegranate is pais?? :p dang fail my BM

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  6. eiling: yeah, it's kinda like a modern reinterpretation of malay food ... or fusion, to use a less pretty description, heh :D
    michelle: ya, ibunda's pretty decent too and also quite creative (though the last time was there was maybe a year ago, so i'm not sure if they've maintained their standards)
    augustdiners: yep, in a sense, these fine-dining outlets aren't competing with the mamak places, but they're offering something completely different :D
    lemongrass: true, bunga emas is another good one. hmmm, i just realized that for the "otak-otak berkirai," i have no idea what "berkirai" means :D
    babe_kl: yes, gulai house and the dining room no longer exist, so carcosa only has this one restaurant that's open for dinner now (since the drawing room is only for tea). yikes, i dunno what 'pais' means either :D

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  7. Those dishes look hardly "malay" to me :D If not for their canggih names, I would have thought they're just some western fine-dining items!

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  8. pureglutton: ya, i guess it's the use of certain herbs and spices that still give it the flavor and aroma of "kampung" cooking, heheh

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  9. Eh!!! Malay dining still got red wine?? I thought against religion :P

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  10. Ooh, this joint reminds of Ibunda.

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  11. Leo: ya, Muslims can't drink, but the rest of us all can!
    Eatdrinkmunch: yeah, very similar!

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  12. price wise? expensive or no?

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  13. ciki: maybe 100 ringgit for a main course and dessert...

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