Sunday, February 27, 2011

Ozeki Tokyo

One of my longtime favorite haunts in KL, though my visits here have become infrequent in recent years as Japanese restaurants run rampant across the city.

Ozeki features one of the most extensive menus ever, with a remarkable range of both traditional recipes and avant-garde delicacies that make repeat visits essential.

The nigiri sushi platter is worth a splurge, comprising a top-notch harvest from the ocean, including sea urchin, clams, shrimp and all the fish we could want.

Futomaki, stuffed with 16 ingredients. A jaw-dropping creation, mouth-wateringly tasty. Recommended for anyone who complains that other restaurants are too stingy with their maki roll ingredients.

Battera sushi (Osaka-style pressed sushi with marinated mackerel). A throwback to how sushi was prepared in parts of Japan decades ago. Might not be for everyone though; the mackerel tastes pretty fishy and vinegary, with a whole lotta rice in each piece.

Pan-fried grilled Kobe beef roll. Succulent meat, several notches above regular beef.

Of course, customers can order fresh-tasting raw fish without rice. Highlights include mekajiki toro sashimi (big-eyed tuna) & bachimaguro akami (regular tuna).

Yuzu sorbet _ a refreshing treat, laced with tiny bits of citrus fruit _ & chocolate chili ice cream (too much spice overwhelmed the chocolate flavor).


Ozeki Tokyo Cuisine,
Menara TA One, Jalan P Ramlee.

17 comments:

  1. It didnt seem that much when i see it here but it was so filling!

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  2. Hey, how can you tell if one sake is better than another?

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  3. tng: rice is filling! and i guess the makis here are pretty substantial ... so many pieces in each serving, and each piece is gigantic! :D
    michelle: the best ones are supposed to be light and fragrant, i think .... easy to drink, but with with some complex notes...

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  4. Hi.So is the food here very expensive?

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  5. nice choice of junmai ginjo (ur jozen mizunogotoshi sake)... can be a bit sweet at times but it looked like it paired well with the stronger tasting stuff like the osaka style sushi.

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  6. Porch: oh, it kinda depends on the order. there's sushi nigiri by the piece that costs rm4, but if you choose the premium rolls, they can cost rm50 or more...
    Lanatir: thanks for the info! Truthfully though, I know only a little about how to pair sake with food. The only reason I chose this was because it was their sake of the month, specially discounted! =)

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  7. Battera sushi sounds awesome! I love Mackerel in any form;)

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  8. Ciki: holy mackerel! (that used to be one of my favorite phrases when I was younger, hehe) :D

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  9. Sean, looks like u had the sake cold... should suit the flavour a bit more. did u notice any flavour changes as it got warmer?

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  10. ooh i am most interested in that kobe roll! yums

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  11. lanatir: yep, we had it cold. and we drank it pretty quickly (within an hour), so didn't really notice any flavor changes. i've been trying to get into having warm sake recently though, on rainy evenings =)
    eiling: yeah, it was tasty, though it definitely wasn't the best cuts of the beef. some might consider it a waste of the beef though, since it's difficult to appreciate its taste and texture in a maki packed with rice and other ingredients...

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  12. used to go there quite often when my office was at KLCC :D

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  13. ky: heheh, my office is a 10-minute drive from this place, so i really should try to eat here more often =)

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  14. Sean, the rule of thumb for drinking sake warm is to drink it with lower grade sake or cheaper sake. if u drink junmai or junmai daiginjyo, then try it as cold first.

    heat will hide most flaws of warm sake - so best to go with house sake or honjozo

    there are exceptions of course.

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  15. lanatir: ahh, thanks for the info. yeah, i tend to order house sake a lot, since the premium brands seem too pricey (i'm not familiar with the names you mentioned). i like 'em cold, generally, but i'll be making it a habit to order them warm from now on =)

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  16. well doesn't hurt to try.

    if anything, in future, if u want nice clean sake without breaking the bank, just go for any sake that states it's a junmai. rice shd be polished down to 60-70% of its original grain. the one u selected wash polished down to 60%.

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  17. lanatir: junmai, got it! thanks again. will try to take some notes about the taste of the sake and elaborate on it in future blog entries! =)

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