Monday, March 13, 2017

Sham Shui Po @ Hong Kong

A stroll through the Sham Shui Po neighbourhood takes travellers to down-to-earth corners of Kowloon, promising a taste of working-class Hong Kong. Start with breakfast at Kowloon Restaurant, a classic cha chaan teng, where locals can be spotted ordering the iconic offerings of giant pineapple-shaped buns & tongue-scorching milk tea.

You'll work up an appetite with this walk - keep hunger at bay with smooth rice noodle rolls complemented by a medley of delicious gravies & sauces at the perpetually bustling Hop Yick Tai.

Next, something light - A1 Tofu Company serves one of the most satisfying bean curd desserts we've ever had, boasting a beautiful taste & texture, best enjoyed with ginger sugar syrup.

 Is it time for lunch yet? Duck into one of the numerous roast meat purveyors for siu yuk & sliced pork knuckle with rice.

Also worth a stop: Lau Sum Kee, a time-honoured destination for traditional egg noodles, firm with a real bite, proudly made according to the restaurant's half-century-old recipe, sprinkled with briny-sweet powdered shrimp roe.

Save the sweets for last: Popular Chinese bakery Eight Angels, where folks flock for fresh, crunchy walnut & almond cookies. 


8 comments:

  1. That's one handsome barista, your first pic. Like a cross between Leonardo diCaprio and Matt Damon. LOL!!!

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    1. Suituapui: ooo, he might be quite flattered by your encouraging comparison! :)

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  2. That polo bun really looks different from the ones here...it's as if a cookie is sitting on top of the bun! :D But I must say our local siew yoke looks a lot better....hehe! ;)

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    1. Contact.ewew: ooo, you're right, from the angle of that photograph, it does look like a cookie instead of just the crust :) and i agree with you about the siu yok too! :D

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  3. I enjoy eating all the food you posted. They make the best Chinese food with innovative ingredients. I love to visit Hong Kong because it is easy to get around with so much d delicious food and shopping areas. I first visited in 1985 when planes still hovered above Kowloon and landed at Kai Tak. I miss those crowded days.

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    1. Twilight Man: that's true - HK's train transport is quite a breeze. and the city has so many eating streets to explore. it'll be interesting to see what the city will be like in 2040, if we're still around! :)

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  4. I know Sham Shui Po is a neighbourhood that more 'lower class", knowledge I got from years of wathching HK dramas LOL

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    1. Choi Yen: you're right - there are a lot of flats cramped with residents in this area ...

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