Thursday, September 19, 2013

Safura Myanmar Noodles @ Pudu

Renewing a passport at Pudu's Urban Transformation Center? The one-hour processing wait won't seem so long for folks who take the short stroll nearby to Safura Restaurant, one of KL's more accessible purveyors of Burmese cooking.

Noodles from Myanmar are Safura's highlight: Naturally there's mohinga (RM4), the laksa-like recipe of vermicelli in a fragrantly fulfilling fish-paste broth with chickpea flour, boiled eggs, fish cakes, crispy-fried onions, coriander & more.

Not rich but delicately & deftly nuanced; every mouthful left us anticipating the next, eager to discover what nutty, eggy or briny flavor might emerge.

A less-creamy version of noodles in fish soup is also available, though we know not its exact name. Could be a variation of Rakhine mont di, maybe.

Served with a terrifying green-red chili sauce that's complex & packs plenty of firepower. 

Panthay egg noodles, reputedly a Myanmar Chinese-Muslim recipe. Essentially egg noodles with chicken & veggies in something of a soy sauce. Street food, soul food.

Most of the noodles here are served with chicken soup & assorted condiments.

Shan noodles, a sticky sort with echoes of glass noodles, with peanuts & tomato sauce.

The noodles are eaten with kitchen-made pickled radish that supply an addictive tang.

Saving the best for last: Si Chet Khao Swe, Burmese oily noodles.

Garlicky & meaty with pleasurably chewy chicken. All portions are princely, ensuring that an entire football team could eat here on one RM50 note.

No liquor is available, but it's only a minute's walk to Pudu's Ancasa, where Casa R&B might be one of the city's least-populated hotel lounges.

Two glasses of wine here (drinkable, barely) cost double the Burmese noodle dinner. Gosh.

Safura Restaurant,
Pudu, Kuala Lumpur. Ermm, street-level of what was Kota Raya. Think this is Jalan Silang.

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32 comments:

  1. All I know about Pudu is the bus station LOL! Is this place far from the bus station? I can check it out if i happen to travel to KL by bus since they have some really interesting choices of noodles here :)

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    1. Ken: heh, it's just a three-minute walk from the bus station complex. ya, it's actually worth trying. food's interesting and tasty, the people are pleasant, the prices are very fair =)

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    2. Haha i have no sense of direction, but shall mark this place down and google it out, thanks for the info Sean :)

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    3. Ken: heh, i'm also pretty hopeless with directions, so if we ever roam together, we might both end up lost (though our smartphones will probably save us) :D

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  2. There's quite a bit of Burmese folks in Pudu. Shall check this out as well. Definitely has a lot more to offer than the usual stall that I get my Burmese fix from.

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    1. Missyblurkit: yeah, it was a bit difficult to figure out what some of these dishes were, since the menu's not very helpful, but this place is certainly worth exploring for something interesting =)

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  3. Loving the mohinga, fish soup noodles and the oily noodles...worth having IF I m in the area n looking for something different...hehe =)

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    1. Ulric: true, it might even be worth scheduling your next passport renewal or other government documentation stuff at pudu, just so you can hop over to this burmese eatery nearby and have some hot plates of nice noodles :D

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  4. Oh? Kota Raya's no more? Used to get off the mini buses there to cross over to Jalan Petaling.

    I had Myanmarese cuisine at a stall in Jalan Alur once. Nice, loved it! This does look like a very nice place.

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    1. Suituapui: oh, the kotaraya building's still there, but am not sure if it's still called that these days, heh =) ya, there's a satisfying quality to these myanmarese dishes. they're quite brilliant in their own =)

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  5. Self service? So this is like a buffet place, Sean? I love the decor.

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    1. Linda: oh, there's a section at this place where you can get food that's displayed on trays, buffet-style, but they also allow you to have food that's cooked-to-order :D

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  6. I have never tried Burmese cooking, something new to me. And the price is very friendly. :P

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    1. CK: ya, quite difficult to find burmese cooking in most of the neighborhoods that we usually visit in KL. and yeah, each plate is about RM4-RM6, so it's quite affordable for us =)

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  7. On yummy! I'll love to try this. In case I'm visiting with a Muslim friend, I have to ask, Does the noodle comes with pork? I read chicken so far but just want to be sure. What are theoperatin hours?

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    1. Rebecca: ooh, the outlet doesn't serve pork. there were quite a few muslim customers here, so i guess it makes business sense in this area to keep away from pork =) yikes, not sure what the business hours are, though i suspect all day long, from morning to night (definitely still open at night) =)

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    2. Rebecca: hope you enjoy it! a few of the burmese nationals who run this place are quite friendly (though not all of them, heh) =)

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  8. The above noodle looks yummy. Especially they served it with terrifying green-red chili sauce!

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    1. Melissa: heheh, yeah, really good noodles, though i prefer them without chili sauce! :D

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  9. I'd love to try some of those noodles. I'm yet to try any Burmese dishes.

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    1. The Yum List: yeah, i was glad to have this chance to check out this place. i don't think burmese food will ever be my all-time favorite, but it's still pretty tasty in its own way =)

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  10. the food looks like malay's, sprinkled with lotsa fried onion and scallion :/

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    1. Constance: ooo, there's definitely some southeast asian similarities, though the flavors are quite distinct :D

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  11. Cheap and cheerful food, that's all we need sometimes :)

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    1. Baby Sumo: yeah, you're right, this meal certainly left me cheerful =)

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  12. Never really tried Burmese food - the noodles look good!

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    1. Pureglutton: yeah, i wish we had more burmese eateries in kl, especially in more diverse locations, heh =)

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  13. How about the banana tree stem in the mohinga? that's the best part! OMG u said the magic words... me and jo LOVE Myanmarese food... sigh.. i want to go back to yangon now! :)

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    1. Ciki: ooo, there's banana tree stem in there? heheh, i didn't recognize it, maybe since the bowl's flooded with so many ingredients! :D ooo, take me to yangon tooooo! i wanna eat mohinga every morning. heheh :D

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  14. wow the food does look yummy and the last noodle dish looked more like pan mee! hehehe

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    1. Eiling: yeah, it's surprisingly very delcious. heheh, and ya, a lot of similarities with our malaysian noodle recipes :D

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